Magnetism through liquids

Table: 400

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Abstract:

Introduction

I like working on science experiments with my small science kit. I usually do my experiments in the kitchen or the basement. I was working on one of the projects from Smithsonian Maker Lab Super Cool projects book, which was to make a density tower with different liquids like honey, milk, dishwash liquid, water and oil in a glass container. The density tower looked awesome with colored liquids layered on top of another because liquids with different densities do not mix together. In this experiment, the most dense liquids form the bottom of the tower and the least dense float on top. I also dropped different items like ping-pong ball, small tomato and metal bolts into the density tower. These items were floating at different layers, I learnt that a liquid can support anything that is less dense than itself. Then I happened to think whether I’ll be able to move the metal bolts inside the density tower using a magnet from outside. That formed the basis for my idea for this science project.

Hypothesis

The more denser the liquid is, the magnetic force will be lower compared to the force in less denser liquid.

Procedure

Pour different liquids (honey, milk, dishwash liquid, water and oil) in transparent plastic cups. Drop same number of paperclips inside each liquid. Use three different magnets (with small, medium and strong magnetic powers). Hold the magnet one by one outside each cup and as the paperclips get stuck to the magnet, slide the magnet up. Record the number of paperclips that got stuck to the magnet and the number of seconds it took. Repeat the steps for all 5 liquids with different magnets.

Data and Analysis

The small magnet took more time to attract paper clips in different liquids, followed by medium magnet and the strong magnet took the least amount of time. This was observed for all liquids in plastic cups.

As per density tower, milk has more density than dishwash liquid and water. As per test results, magnetic force was faster in milk compared to dishwash liquid and water. Similarly, honey has more density than dishwash liquid, but dishwash liquid took more seconds to attract paperclips than honey. Oil has the least density when compared to other liquids, but it could attract only less paperclips with small magnet whereas water and milk were able to attract more number of paperclips with the same magnet.

Conclusion

My hypothesis was incorrect because the magnetic force was faster in milk when compared to less denser liquids like dishwash liquid and water. So, the more denser the liquid is, the magnetic force may not be lower compared to the force in less denser liquid.

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Research Plan:

Introduction

I like working on science experiments with my small science kit.  I usually do my experiments in the kitchen or the basement.  I was working on one of the projects from Smithsonian Maker Lab Super Cool projects book, which was to make a density tower with different liquids like honey, milk, dishwash liquid, water and oil in a glass container.  The density tower looked awesome with colored liquids layered on top of another because liquids with different densities do not mix together.  In this experiment, the most dense liquids form the bottom of the tower and the least dense float on top.  I also dropped different items like ping-pong ball, small tomato and metal bolts into the density tower.  These items were floating at different layers, I learnt that a liquid can support anything that is less dense than itself.  Then I happened to think whether I’ll be able to move the metal bolts inside the density tower using a magnet from outside.  That formed the basis for my idea for this science project.

Hypothesis

The more denser the liquid is, the magnetic force will be lower compared to the force in less denser liquid.

Plan for experiments

Pour different liquids (honey, milk, dishwash liquid, water and oil) in transparent plastic cups.  Drop same number of paperclips inside each liquid.  Use three different magnets (with small, medium and strong magnetic powers).  Hold the magnet one by one outside each cup and as the paperclips get stuck to the magnet, slide the magnet up.  Record the number of paperclips that got stuck to the magnet and the number of seconds it took.  Repeat the steps for all 5 liquids with different magnets.  

Materials

  • 3 Magnets – fridge magnet (small magnetic force), circle magnet (medium magnetic force), bar magnet (strong magnetic force)
  • 5 plastic cups
  • A pack of paperclips (at least 50)
  • Measuring cup
  • Water (200 ml)
  • Cooking Oil (200 ml)
  • Dishwash liquid (200 ml)
  • Milk (200 ml)
  • Honey (200 ml)

Variables

Independent variables: variables changed on purpose in an experiment

  • Magnets
  • Liquids
  • Liquid containers

Dependent variables: results of the experiment (variable that is influenced by the independent variables)

  • Number of paperclips attracted to the magnet
  • Time taken in seconds

Constants:

  • Amount of different liquids in each container
  • Number of paperclips in each container
  • Same 3 magnets

Procedure

  1. Fill 100 ml of each liquid – cooking oil, water, dishwash liquid, milk and honey – one each in 5 transparent plastic cups (use measuring cup as needed)
  2. Put 5 paperclips in each plastic cup and wait until all paperclips settle to the bottom of the cup
  3. Take the magnet (small one first) and hold it outside the first plastic cup filled with oil.  Wait until at least few paperclips get attached to the magnet and slowly slide the magnet up still touching the outside of the plastic cup
  4. Record the number of paperclips attached and the time it took in seconds
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 for the other 4 liquids in cups
  6. Repeat steps 3, 4, 5 for the other 2 magnets (medium and strong) and record data

Questions and Answers

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