Solar Power

Table: 415

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Abstract:

Analysis



●The Average in the day is 20 seconds on batteries

●The Average in the day is 26 seconds on solar panels

●The Average on a cloudy day is 20 seconds on batteries

●The Average on a cloudy day is 10 seconds on solar panels

●The Average during the nighttime is 10 seconds on batteries

●The Average during the nighttime is 0 seconds on solar panels

Conclusion


Batteries had a better average reliability than solar panels, In some conditions solar power is better, but overall batteries are the more reliable source



Bibliography/Citations:

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Research Plan:

I will research whether using sunlight as an energy source more reliable in different weather conditions than traditional batteries.                                    Materials needed are: 

 

Mini breadboard 2xAAA battery holder AAA batteries (2) Mini vibration motors (2) Toggle switch Mini solar cells (2) 1 inch red jumper wire 1 inch black jumper wire Identical toothbrushes (2); Scissors or wire cutters Double-sided foam tape Stopwatch Lab notebook Procedure: 1.Use household materials to set up a "chute" to force your robot to go straight.  Make sure you use a smooth, flat surface (the bristles will get stuck on rough surfaces like carpet). 2.In your lab notebook, set up a data table. The data table to record how long it takes the robot to go from one end of the course to the other in seconds (sec). a.Record exact weather conditions you are able to test may depend on the time of year and the climate where you live. 3. Take the robot and your test course outside on a sunny day. a.Get your stopwatch ready. b.Slide the power switch "down" to set the robot to battery power. c.Set the robot down on one end of your course. As soon as you do, start the stopwatch. d.Watch your robot as it goes down the course. e.As soon as the robot reaches the other end of the course, stop the stopwatch. f.Record the time in your data table in the row for "battery power" and "full sunlight". g.Repeat step 3 two more times and record the data in the appropriate trial columns.

4.Switch the robot to solar power by sliding the power switch "up". This will ensure that they receive the maximum amount of solar power possible. The wires connected to the solar panels are flexible, so you can bend them slightly to aim the panels toward the sun.

5.Take the robot and your test course outside on a sunny day.

a.Get your stopwatch ready. b.Slide the power switch "down" to set the robot to battery power. c.Set the robot down on one end of your course. As soon as you do, start the stopwatch. d.Watch your robot as it goes down the course. e.As soon as the robot reaches the other end of the course, stop the stopwatch. f.Record the time in your data table in the row for "battery power" and "full sunlight". g.Repeat step 3 two more times and record the data in the appropriate trial columns.